2022 Maserati Project24

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MASERATI has released more details of its Project24 supersport scar this week, the model said to “raise the brand’s unlimited performance to a new level”.

The non-homologated track-only car inherits many of its specifications from the Maserati MC20 road car, its twin-turbocharged 3.0-litre Nettuno V6 bolstered to offer 740hp (552kW, up 82kW) to provide the 1250kg model with “the perfect combination of output and lightness”.

Said to offer a power-to-weight ratio of 1.69kg/hp, the Project24 combines race-ready features such as a twin combustion and twin spark ignition system with double combustion control technology, a dry sump, six-speed sequential racing gearbox with paddle shifters, a racing clutch and limited-slip self-locking mechanical differential.

The carbon-fibre body includes high-performance aerodynamics – including adjustable front and rear wings – LED headlights, an FIA-approved rain light, Lexan front and side windows, an FIA-homologated FT3 120-litre fuel tank, FIA-spec fire extinguisher, and an FIA-homologated safety cage.

Designed by Centro Stile Maserati, the Maserati Project24 combines what its maker says is an innovative double wishbone suspension system – replete with adjustable dampers and anti-roll bars – with Brembo CCMR ventilated carbon-ceramic brakes, 18-inch centre-lock aluminium wheels, and slick tyres “tuned up for racing”.

Its carbon-fibre monocoque is even equipped with its own on-board air jacks.

The two-seat model – which measures 2020mm wide and 1220mm high – will be sold with a unique range of services, including “track-specific experiences and state-of-the-art support”, Maserati says.

Interior equipment includes an adjustable racing pedal box and steering column, six-point harness, multi-function carbon-fibre steering wheel with built-in display, dash and data acquisition system, air-conditioning and adjustable racing ABS and traction control.

The Maserati Porject24 is further available with options including racing seats, rear-view camera display, telemetry recording, in-car camera, driving performance optimisation display and tyre-pressure monitoring.

Pricing for the model has not been advised, though it is likely a case of if you have to ask, you can’t afford it.

The Project 24 is the second MC20-based variant to be released by Maserati this year. 

Alongside the sold-out 470kW/730Nm coupe – which is priced from $438,000 before on-road costs locally – the Italian firm has also released its MC20 Cielo convertible in May, the road-going model due in Australia towards the middle of next year.

The Maserati MC20 Cielo features an electrically operated glass roof which can stow or deploy in 12 seconds and at speeds up to 50km/h.

 

At 909mm long and 615mm wide, the glass roof is the largest in its segment and includes Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystal (PDLC) technology that turns it from clear to opaque at the push of a button.

Maserati says the technology operates comfortably between temperatures of -30°C and +85°C.

The Modena-based brand also says the folding roof does not impact luggage space and maintains the same level of thermal and sound insulation as the coupe.

Like all convertible variants, the MC20 Cielo features additional bracing to support the open space of the retracted roof, adding 65kg to the coupe’s kerb weight (1500kg).

Named for the Italian word for ‘sky’, the Cielo features several styling changes over the MC20 coupe including newly positioned air deflectors and engine air intakes, and re-sculpted B-pillars. It is also the first MC20 variant to include autonomous emergency braking (AEB).

The Cielo can be optioned with a matte titanium engine cover, various diamond-cut alloy wheel designs, and model-specific Acquamarina paint in addition to a choice of six standard colours: Bianco Audace (white), Blu Infinito (blue), Giallo Genio (yellow), Grigio Incognito (grey), Grigio Mistero (grey) and Ross Vincente (red).

Other options include 360-degree parking cameras, blind-spot monitoring, rear parking sensors, reversing camera and traffic sign recognition.

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